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1 edition of Coke formation on metal surfaces found in the catalog.

Coke formation on metal surfaces

Coke formation on metal surfaces

based on a symposium jointly sponsored by the ACS Divisions of Petroleum and Industrial and Engineering Chemistry at the 182nd Meeting of the American Chemical Society New York, New York, August 27, 1981

  • 248 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by ACS in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Metals -- Surfaces.,
  • Metals at high temperatures.,
  • Coke.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementLyle F. Albright, R. T. K. Baker, editors.
    SeriesACS symposium series -- 202
    ContributionsAlbright, Lyle Frederick., Baker, R. T. K., American Chemical Society. Division of Petroleum Chemistry., American Chemical Society. Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry., American Chemical Society (Meeting), (182nd : 1981 : New York)
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii,318p. :
    Number of Pages318
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19901415M

    The coke contains sulfur compounds and metal impurities, which must be removed before further treatment for environment consideration Coking is a preferred process for oil from tar sand. Coking Coking is a semi-continuous operation as the solid coke should be . Here's part of a review of the book from metalsmith/jeweler guru Tim McCreight: "It doesn't take long to realize that crimping metal is work born in equal parts of enthusiasm, exploration, and diligence. One of the pieces made by the author bears the date and it seems like a safe bet that work on this book goes back that s: 9.

      Though the surface of a Mentos candy may look smooth, at a microscopic level it’s full of pits, peaks, and craters, like a miniature version of the surface of the moon. These pits, peaks, and craters are referred to as nucleation sites. They provide a surface for the carbon dioxide bubbles to form on, and allow them to form much more rapidly. Coke formation on preoxidized iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) specimen was studied in a 15% methane-hydrogen gas (CH 4-H 2) atmosphere at 1,00°C by thermogravimetry. Ground specimen of different surface finish were investigated also. An accelerated heterogeneous reaction resulted when the Fe specimen were preoxidized, resulting in a heavy coke.

    coke depends on operating parameters, feedstock type, on the reactor and TLE material, their surface modifications and also on addition of inhibitors. Summary of information about coke formation. Petroleum coke, abbreviated coke or petcoke, is a final carbon-rich solid material that derives from oil refining, and is one type of the group of fuels referred to as e is the coke that, in particular, derives from a final cracking process—a thermo-based chemical engineering process that splits long chain hydrocarbons of petroleum into shorter chains—that takes place in units.


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Coke formation on metal surfaces Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Coke formation on metal surfaces. [Lyle Frederick Albright; R Terry K Baker; American Chemical Society. Meeting; American Chemical Society. Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry.; American Chemical Society. Division of Petroleum Chemistry.].

Coke formation on metal surfaces by Lyle Frederick Albright,American Chemical Society edition, in EnglishPages:   Therefore, the catalytic formation of “coke” by metallic sites can only be demonstrated by using non-supported metals. In model catalytic studies using platinum single crystals, the formation of submonolayer quantities of strongly bound carbonaceous deposits on the metal surfaces was demonstrated by Auger electron spectroscopy.

During the Cited by:   Get this from a library. Coke formation on metal surfaces: based on a symposium jointly sponsored by the ACS Divisions of Petroleum and Industrial and Engineering Chemistry at the nd Meeting of the American Chemical Society, New York, New York, Aug [Lyle Frederick Albright; R T K Baker; American Chemical Society.

Division of Petroleum Chemistry. Coke inhibitors, i.e., chemical additives, or special coating of metal surfaces which suppress coke formation.

Coke inhibitors/surface coating work by passivating catalytically active metal sites. Coke deposits on metal and acid sites give rise to different TPO peaks, the high temperature peak increases with the concentration of Brønsted sites.

For high Cu/Pt ratios, coke formation on metal particles is negligible, showing that coke formation on metal surfaces is ensemble-specific.

special coating of metal surfaces which suppress coke formation. Coke inhibitors/surface coating work by passivating catalytically active metal sites through cbemical bonding interactions, and/or. RETURN TO BOOK PREV Chapter NEXT. Coke Formation on Metal Surfaces.

Chapter 7 pp ACS Symposium Series Vol. ISBN Impact of Initial Surface Roughness and Aging on Coke Formation during Ethane Steam Cracking. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research  The coke formation with and without catalytic reforming and water have been compared. Spraying a catalyst on the reactor wall decreases coke formation by preventing the formation of filamentous coke on the metal surface.

The decrease of coke precursors consumed by catalytic steam reforming results in the decline of a polymerization condensation. At K, with the increase in metal loading, the decrease in CO yield was accelerated during the reaction.

This sudden deactivation, shown especially at higher metal loadings, can be explained by rapid coke formation on the catalyst surface at the low temperatures thermodynamically favorable for coking.

An experimental reaction setup consisting of an electric furnace and a quartz reactor with metal coupons inside it was used to study the rate of coke formation on the metal surfaces in different ra.

Thermophysical Properties and Water Saturation of [PF6]-Based Ionic Liquids; Thirteen-electron manganese(II) tetraalkyls. Synthesis, characterization, and x-ray crystal structures of [Li(tmed)]2[MnMe4] and -unstable species [Li(tmed)]2[MnEt4] and [Li(tmed)]2[Mn(CH2CH2-tert-Bu)4].

In the second part the formation and chemistry of coke is discussed. Chapter Two details the results of coke quantification experiments on silica gel, a- y- and r]-Al The y-Al is modified by the addition of acids, bases, Sn, Ce and Zr and the effect of these on coke formation is again studied.

Formation and Removal of Coke Deposited on Stainless Steel and Vycor Surfaces from Acetylene and Ethylene JAMES C. MAREK and LYLE F. ALBRIGHT Chapter 7, pp The modes of formation of carbonaceous deposits (“coke”) during the transformation of organic compounds over acid and over bifunctional noble metal-acid catalysts are described.

Fe and Ni on metal surfaces are widely believed to aid coke formation/deposition. The effect of tube materials on coke deposition under TLE conditions was clearly demonstrated by Bach et al. [19], who comparatively measured the coking rates of 12 different kinds of steels.

The coke formation rate for acetylene on surface free of metals is 10 times higher than. effect of metal surface [1,9,14,16,2 1, 30]. Formed coke layer reduces quantity of catalytic. @article{osti_, title = {The influence of metal surface and sulfur addition on coke deposition in the thermal cracking of hydrocarbons}, author = {Reyniers, M F.S.G.

and Froment, G F}, abstractNote = {Coke formation in the thermal cracking of hydrocarbons was studied in a pilot plant unit and in a micro-reactor with complete mixing of the gas phase, containing a hollow cylinder suspended.

State-of-the-art of Coke Formation during Steam Cracking: Anti-Coking Surface Technologies. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research57 (48), Steam cracking furnaces produce olefins, which are high-value feeds in the petrochemical industry.

Coke formation is an unavoidable part of a thermal cracking furnace. The amount of coke created depends on feed quality, operating conditions and the metal surface of the coil.

Coke can be generated through different mechanisms, but the most important are catalytic and asymptotic, or pyrolytic. Coke deposition on the zeolite catalysts in the conversion of furan (a main intermediate of biomass fast pyrolysis) is of serious concern for catalyst deactivation and product distribution.

It is important to find out the nature and composition of coke on the spent ZSM-5 catalyst to study the coke-depositing behaviors. In this work, spent ZSM-5 catalysts obtained from furan catalytic.Coke is a grey, hard, and porous fuel with a high carbon content and few impurities, made by heating coal or oil in the absence of air—a destructive distillation process.

It is an important industrial product, used mainly in iron ore smelting, but also as a fuel in stoves and forges when air pollution is a concern. The unqualified term "coke" usually refers to the product derived from low.Most surface reactions are undesired and lead to production of significant amounts of coke, carbon oxides, hydrogen and methane.

Surface reactions that occur in addition to coking and decoking include oxidation, reduction, sulfiding, and desulfiding of the inner surfaces .